Ras el Hanout

from Classic Vegetarian Cooking From the Middle East and North Africa by Habeeb Salloum Ras el Hanout means “top of the shop.” For North African souks, or spice merchants, it is a point of honor to have the most sought after version of this blend. Ingredients: 1 tablespoon ground cumin1 tablespoon ground ginger1/2 teaspoon turmeric1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon1 tablespoon black […]

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Harissa

adapted from The North African Kitchen by Fiona Dunlop The word for the fiery Tunesian chili paste harissa is derived from the Arabic verb harasa, “to pound.” Ingredients: 1 tablespoon coriander seeds 1 tablespoon caraway seeds 2 teaspoons cumin seeds 9 oz. fresh red chilis, roughly chopped cloves from 1 head of garlic, peeled and roughly chopped 1 tablespoon dried […]

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Tahini Sauce

The English word tahini comes from the Arabic ṭaḥīnīa, and is derived from the verb “to grind.” This extremely popular sauce is used in most North African sandwiches. Ingredients: 1/2 cup tahini1/2 cup low fat yogurt or waterjuice of 1 lemon2 garlic cloves, choppedsalt to tastepinch hot paprika or cayenne Preparation: Combine all the ingredients in […]

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Falafel

These chickpea fritters are traditionally deep fried. For a lighter, more delicate version, pan fry in almond oil. The word falafel comes from the Arabic falāfil, the plural of filfil which means “pepper,” from the Sanskrit word pippalī, or “long pepper.” Ingredients: 2 cups dried chickpeas, soaked in water overnight1 teaspoon baking powder1 small onion, coarsely chopped 6 garlic cloves1 tablespoon […]

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Tabouli

adapted from The New Moosewood Cookbook by Mollie Katzen The name for this bulgur wheat and parsley salad, tabouli, translates as “little seasoning,” and is derived from the Arabic word tabil. Ingredients: 1 cup bulgur wheat1 1/2 cups boiling water1 teaspoon salt1/2 teaspoon pepperjuice of 1 lemon1/4 cup olive oil4 cloves garlic, minced4 scallions, chopped1 cup chopped parsley, packed1/4 […]

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